jcopland
dan-hill:


The day before **Off Switch** was due to go live, the shootings at Fort Hood happened. The team and I decided to not run it. The subject matter of the strip, despite its length, was too close to the bone. We decided we’d run it further down the line, maybe even with a postscript as to why the strip should still be run, why it mattered. Almost two months passed before we attempted to run it again. This time, just as we were about to put it up, the shootings in Isla Vista, California happened. Again, it felt wrong to run the strip. And so here we are. So today this is going up, albeit not in the form or venue we’d planned. But I felt it was worth putting out there still. Firearm control in America is evidently an issue, the confluence of events just around publishing this strip clearly show that. But there are other factors at play too in the Fort Hood shooting in particular, and that’s what I chose to focus on. What follows below is the original text piece that was supposed to run with the strip in the wake of the Fort Hood shootings.
Off Switch is written by myself with art from Alex Diotto, Letters by ET Dollman and colours by Marissa Louise.
Off Switch was written prior to Ivan Lopez, a 34 year old Iraq veteran, opening fire at Fort Hood military base, killing four people and wounding sixteen others, before taking his own life.
At the time of writing, details on Lopez are still scant. He joined the U.S Army in 2008, and served a four month tour in Iraq three years later. He was married and had four children. Lopez had received treatment for depression and anxiety, and there are indications he was being evaluated for PTSD. None of these excuse the things that Lopez did. But the spectre of possibility raised by his mental health point to a wider issue.
According to the Washington Post almost one and a half million Americans who fought in Afghanistan or Iraq are struggling with physical and mental health problems stemming from their service.
In Defense Department parlance “wounded in action” only extends to “direct result of hostile action.” This wording doesn’t allow for the invisible scars and wounds in the minds of those afflicted. The military has always been a stressful occupation, but the nature of warfare has changed in the post-9/11 landscape, with asymmetric, seemingly never ending conflicts now the norm.
31% of the same veterans polled by the Post reported the wars had caused them mental and emotional problems. One in two stated they knew someone who’d attempted or committed suicide, with a more recent report stating that two dozen veterans are killing themselves every day — almost one an hour. They’re men like Daniel Somers, a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom. He took his life on June 10th 2013, leaving his family a note.

"My body has become nothing but a cage, a source of pain and constant problems. The illness I have has caused me pain that not even the strongest medicines could dull, and there is no cure. All day, every day a screaming agony in every nerve ending in my body. It is nothing short of torture. My mind is a wasteland, filled with visions of incredible horror, unceasing depression, and crippling anxiety, even with all of the medications the doctors dare give. Simple things that everyone else takes for granted are nearly impossible for me. I can not laugh or cry. I can barely leave the house. I derive no pleasure from any activity. Everything simply comes down to passing time until I can sleep again. Now, to sleep forever seems to be the most merciful thing."

In 2012 the number of US active duty suicides outstripped the number of combat-related deaths.
Violence against the self are, as we unfortunately learned, not the only outlets for those suffering under the stresses and fatigue of mental health issues and life in the military. The number of killings committed by current and former service members hit its peak in 2006. Of those crimes, those committed against family members and significant others are the highest.
The majority of those who served, and those who’ve suffered because of it, will not go down the same path that Ivan Lopez did. Thankfully, the US military has gone to great efforts in recent years to destigmatize issues surrounding mental health. But it needs to do more. It needs to ensure that every soldier (no matter their role) has an effective support system in place. It needs to ensure that depression, anxiety and post traumatic stress disorder are treated with as much weight as any physical injury.
As Christopher Stevens, a former Army staff sergeant amongst those polled, said:

“When I raised my right hand and said, ‘I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States of America,’ when I gave them everything I could, I expect the same in return.”

I delayed running Off Switch because it felt like the right thing to do, the respectful thing to do. But it was never my intention to can it indefinitely. It’d only continue to propagate the veil of silence that surrounds the issue of mental health, mental illness and life in the military. It’s a conversation that needs to continue.

dan-hill:

The day before **Off Switch** was due to go live, the shootings at Fort Hood happened. The team and I decided to not run it. The subject matter of the strip, despite its length, was too close to the bone. We decided we’d run it further down the line, maybe even with a postscript as to why the strip should still be run, why it mattered. Almost two months passed before we attempted to run it again. This time, just as we were about to put it up, the shootings in Isla Vista, California happened. Again, it felt wrong to run the strip. And so here we are. So today this is going up, albeit not in the form or venue we’d planned. But I felt it was worth putting out there still. Firearm control in America is evidently an issue, the confluence of events just around publishing this strip clearly show that. But there are other factors at play too in the Fort Hood shooting in particular, and that’s what I chose to focus on. What follows below is the original text piece that was supposed to run with the strip in the wake of the Fort Hood shootings.

Off Switch is written by myself with art from Alex Diotto, Letters by ET Dollman and colours by Marissa Louise.

Off Switch was written prior to Ivan Lopez, a 34 year old Iraq veteran, opening fire at Fort Hood military base, killing four people and wounding sixteen others, before taking his own life.

At the time of writing, details on Lopez are still scant. He joined the U.S Army in 2008, and served a four month tour in Iraq three years later. He was married and had four children. Lopez had received treatment for depression and anxiety, and there are indications he was being evaluated for PTSD. None of these excuse the things that Lopez did. But the spectre of possibility raised by his mental health point to a wider issue.

According to the Washington Post almost one and a half million Americans who fought in Afghanistan or Iraq are struggling with physical and mental health problems stemming from their service.

In Defense Department parlance “wounded in action” only extends to “direct result of hostile action.” This wording doesn’t allow for the invisible scars and wounds in the minds of those afflicted. The military has always been a stressful occupation, but the nature of warfare has changed in the post-9/11 landscape, with asymmetric, seemingly never ending conflicts now the norm.

31% of the same veterans polled by the Post reported the wars had caused them mental and emotional problems. One in two stated they knew someone who’d attempted or committed suicide, with a more recent report stating that two dozen veterans are killing themselves every day — almost one an hour. They’re men like Daniel Somers, a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom. He took his life on June 10th 2013, leaving his family a note.

"My body has become nothing but a cage, a source of pain and constant problems. The illness I have has caused me pain that not even the strongest medicines could dull, and there is no cure. All day, every day a screaming agony in every nerve ending in my body. It is nothing short of torture. My mind is a wasteland, filled with visions of incredible horror, unceasing depression, and crippling anxiety, even with all of the medications the doctors dare give. Simple things that everyone else takes for granted are nearly impossible for me. I can not laugh or cry. I can barely leave the house. I derive no pleasure from any activity. Everything simply comes down to passing time until I can sleep again. Now, to sleep forever seems to be the most merciful thing."

In 2012 the number of US active duty suicides outstripped the number of combat-related deaths.

Violence against the self are, as we unfortunately learned, not the only outlets for those suffering under the stresses and fatigue of mental health issues and life in the military. The number of killings committed by current and former service members hit its peak in 2006. Of those crimes, those committed against family members and significant others are the highest.

The majority of those who served, and those who’ve suffered because of it, will not go down the same path that Ivan Lopez did. Thankfully, the US military has gone to great efforts in recent years to destigmatize issues surrounding mental health. But it needs to do more. It needs to ensure that every soldier (no matter their role) has an effective support system in place. It needs to ensure that depression, anxiety and post traumatic stress disorder are treated with as much weight as any physical injury.

As Christopher Stevens, a former Army staff sergeant amongst those polled, said:

“When I raised my right hand and said, ‘I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States of America,’ when I gave them everything I could, I expect the same in return.”

I delayed running Off Switch because it felt like the right thing to do, the respectful thing to do. But it was never my intention to can it indefinitely. It’d only continue to propagate the veil of silence that surrounds the issue of mental health, mental illness and life in the military. It’s a conversation that needs to continue.

comixology

comixology:

sispurrier:

image

Crossed isn’t for everyone. I get it. Let’s not go into that right now.

For the purposes of the below thoughts what matters is this: as a world, as a shared fictional universe, Crossed books have a simple and uncomplicated defining rule. To whit: “humanity’s fundamental capacity for…

See what sispurrier has to say about Crossed, and if it’s your thing, check it out here

Nuggets of comic book wisdom by Si.

torsobear

torsobear:

image

Snaplok, an 80s action figure struggling to live down a villainous past, is implicated in a string of violent robot-part robberies. With the police breathing down his neck, he sets out to crack the case and clear his ruined name - only to discover a far greater villainy than his own at work in…

Torsobear Kickstarter is still going and it’s a true crime it hasn’t reached its goal yet. If you ever had a teddy bear or did some crime, do go have a look!  https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/bretturen/torsobear-yarns-from-toyburg

glennmoane

glennmoane:

torsobear:

As this is Torsobear’s Final Week, we’re adding a few extra incentives for backers old and new -

ADD ONS - £15 for a T-Shirt and £45 for a Ruxby Plushie (limited stocks). Just add to your pledge at either of these amounts to get your desired merch item.

MAYOR OF TOYBURG - We have a new top package, if you want the truly ultimate Torsobear set. Individuals get the book and all the merch, plus i’ll paint you a Torsobear-themed art canvas just for you. Retailers will instead receive stock of our books and merch to sell in their store.

Remember, if you think these rewards suit someone you know, you can get extra goodies for referring them. Let’s make this final week our most amazing yet!

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/bretturen/torsobear-yarns-from-toyburg Or pledge via PayPal here - https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/bretturen/torsobear-yarns-from-toyburg/posts/877121

The cool rewards just keep adding up on this one. With about a week left and two thirds of the goal reached, I have a good feeling about this campaign.

If you want this year’s most unique crime anthology sitting on your shelf (after you have read it, of course), please pre-order this baby now.

Get in on this fluffy noir!

royalboiler

18 tips for comics artists by Moebius "brief manual for cartoonist "

  • My 8house collaborator and impressive dude, Xurxo g Penalta translated this Spanish Moebius list of advice for artists. I thought would be cool to post. (Thanks Xurxo)
  • http: //www.jornada.unam.mx/1996/08/18/sem-moebius.html
  • 1. when you draw you must clean yourself of deep feelings (hate, happiness, ambition, etc)
  • 2 it's important to educate the hand, attain obedience, to full fill ideas. but careful with perfection, to much, as well as too much speed, as well as their opposites are dangerous. to much looseness, instant drawings,aside from mistakes, there's no will of the spirit, only the bodies.
  • 3. perspective is of sum importance, it;s a law of manipulation in the good sense, to hypnotise the reader. it;s good to work in real spaces, more that with photos, to exercise our reading of perspective.
  • 4.another thing to learn with affection is the study of the human body, the positions, the types, the expressions, the arquitecture of bodies, the difference between people. the drawing is very different when it come to a male or a female, because in the male you can change a little the lines, it supports to have some impressions. but with the female precision must be perfect, if not she may turn ugly or upset. then no one buys our book! so for the reader believes the story, the characters must have life and personality of their own, gestures that come from character, from their diseases; the body transforms with life and there's a message in the structure, in the distribution of fat, in every muscle, in every fold of the face and body. it;s a study of life.
  • 5. when you make a story you can start with out knowing everything, but making notes (in the actual story) about the particular world of that story. that way the reader recognizes and becomes interested. when a character dies in a story, and that character has no story drawn in his face in his body, in his dress, the reader does not care, there's no emotion. and then the editors say: "your story is worthless, there's only one dead guys and I need 2) or 30 dead guys for it to work" but that is not true, if the dead guy, or wounded guy or sick guys or whomever is in trouble has a real personality that comes from study, from the artists capacity for observation, emotion will emerge (empathy). In the study you develop an attention for others, a compassion, and a love for humanity.
  • it's very important for the development of an artist, if he wants to be a mirror, it must contain inside it;s consciousness the whole world, a mirror that sees everything.
  • 6. jodorwosky says I don't like drawing dead horses. it;s very difficult. it's very difficult to draw a body that sleeps, that's abandoned, because in comics you're always studying action. it;s easier to draw people fighting thats way Americans always draw superheroes. it;s more difficult to draw people talking, because there are a series of movements, very small, but that have a significance, and that accounts for more, because it need love, attention to the other, to the little things that speak of personality, of life. the superheores have no personality, all of them have the same gestures and movements (pantomimes ferocity, running and fighting)
  • 7. equally important is the clothing of the characters, the state they;re in, the materials, the textures are a vision of their experiences, of their lives, their situation in the adventure, that can say a lot with out words. In a drew there's a million folds, you must chose 2 or 3, but the good ones.
  • 8. the style, the stylistically continuity of an artist is symbolical, it can be read like the tarot. I chose as a joke the name Moebius, when I was 22, but in truth there's a meaning to that. if you bring a t shirt with Don Quixote, that speaks to me of who you are. in my case, I give importance to a drawing of relative simplicity, that way subtle indications can be made.
  • 9. when an artist, a drawing artist goes out on the street, he does not see the same things other people see. what he sees is documentation about a way of life, about people.
  • 10. another important element is composition. the composition on our stories must be studied, because a page, or a painting, is a face that looks towards (faces) the reader and that speaks to him. it's not a succession of panels with out meaning. there's panels that are full and some that are empty, others that have a vertical dynamic or a horizontal one, and on that there is intention. the vertical excites (cheers), the horizontal calms, an oblique to the right , for us westerners, represents the action heads towards the future, and oblique to the left directs action toward the past. points (points of attention) represent a dispersion of energy. something places in the middle focalises energy and attention, it concentrates.
  • these are basic symbols for reading, that exercise a fascination, a hypnosis. you must have a consciousness about rhythm, set traps for the reader to fall on to, and if he falls, and gets lost and may move inside them with pleasure because there's life. you must study the great painters, the ones that speak with their paintings, of any school or period, that does not matter, and they must be seen with that preoccupation for physical composition, but also emotional. in what way the combination of lines on that artist touches us directly in the heart.
  • 11. narration must harmonize with the drawing. there must be a visual rhythm from the placement of words, plot must correctly maneuver cadence, to compress or expand time. must weary of the election and direction of characters. use them as a film director and study all different takes.
  • 12. careful with the devastating influence of north american comics in mexico, they only study a little anatomy, dynamic composition, the monsters, the fights, the screaming and teeth (grin). I like them as well, but there are many other possibilities that must be explored.
  • 13. there's a connection between music and drawing. but that depends also on the personality and the moment. for perhaps 10 years I've been working in silence, and for me the music is rhythm of the lines (the music he listens to).
  • to draw is sometimes to hunt for findings, an exact (fair, just) line is an orgasm!
  • 14. color is a language that the artist (drawing artist) uses to manipulate the readers attention and to create beauty. there's objective and subjective color, the emotional states of the character influence the coloring and lighting can change from one panel to the next, depending on the space represented and the time of the day. the language of color must be studied with attention.
  • 15. especially at the beginning of a career, one should work on short stories but of a very high quality. there's a better chance to finish them successfully and place them on a book or with editors.
  • 16. there are times when we are headed to failure knowingly, we choose a theme, an existence, a technique that does not suit (convene) us. you must not complain afterwards.
  • 17. when new pages are sent to editors and see rejection, we should ask for the reasons. we must study the reasons for failure and learn. it's not about struggle with our limitations or with public or the publishers. it's more about treating it like in aikido; the strength (power) of the attack is used to defeat him with the same effort.
  • 18. now it is possible to find reader in any part of the planet. we must have this present. to begin with, drawing is a way of personal communication, but this does not imply that the artist must envelop himself in a bubble; it' communication with the beings near us, with oneself, but also with unknown people. Drawing is a medium to communicate with the great family we have not met, the public, the world.
  • august 18th 1996 compiled by Perez Ruiz